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20121112
20121112
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
boehner, basically had a deal in place, it ended up getting blown up at the last minute. i think there is a, perhaps, a new conciliation on both sides. i think they were waiting for the election to get over. i think the attitudes are positive on both sides. and i think they've got the framework for a deal already set up from last year. so i don't think that there are any closer but i also don't think they were that far away last year in 2011. >> do you think that closing the loopholes would be enough for a deficit reduction package? >> it doesn't appear that that's going to raise enough revenue to get to where the democrats want that to be. republicans say they don't want to raise rates. there are some -- there's some budget chicanery that can go on in terms of dealing with one baseline instead of another baseline. that's what it looked like boehner wanted to do last year. there are a lot of different options here. it's interesting, bill kristol from the weekly standard appeared to be talking to grover norquist, the anti-tax activist in those comments that he played earlier, talk
'll play their hand i think to their full advantage. >> what kind of hand does john boehner have? where sg it leave him and his ability to control the tea party wing? >> it actually puts skron boehner in a good position because during the debt ceiling talks last year, he had a lot of push back from the very far right of his party in the house. the tea party caucus, for example. this time around we won't see the same dynamic at all because the tea party caucus and far right have lost a lot of political capital in light of the election. so what we've already seen is speaker boehner talking to republicans in the house, putting his foot down early and saying we're not going to have that same push back we saw. instead, i'm going to tell you what we're going to do and what this deal is going to look like and you'll fall into line. >> he got criticism because he negotiated a deal and then went back and tried to sell to the party. does he naed to do he need to d way around, get a set position and then go into discussions? >> i think that is the thinking this time around. and he has certainly recog
with both speaker boehner and president obama coming out talkital talking about the fiscal cliff. this week we'll see a round of negotiations capped off by a meeting at the white house between congressional leaders and executive branch coming up on friday. where are they going to end up? there are a lot of solutions kicking around town. the final deal is probably going to end up looking like at least one of these different proposals. let me walk you through four of them here so you get a sense of where we might be headed starting with the simpson bowles plan. they would cap the mortgage industry deduction at $400,000. they would also tax capital gains and dividends as ordinary income and they would have the employer sponsored health care exclusion phased out. that would be a big tax increase there. another plan that's floating around out there, you would see mortgage interest deduction limited to $25,000 of interest. capital gains and dividends here also taxed as ordinary income and the state and local tax deduction would be repealed. the gang of six plan is another one that's kicking aroun
that we've seen since the election, whether it's from the president or the house speaker john boehner, but i can tell you in talking to sources privately on both sides of the aisle, they admit that it's all about positioning and posturing to make sure at the end of the day if we do go off the fiscal cliff that they're not blamed for it. they're the ones who looked reasonable, not unreasonable, and they're preparing for the other side to blame them for the opposite, if that makes sense. that's a lot of what you are saying in public. the reality is that neither side has a really clear machine date or clear vote and no one wants to look at the end of the day like they never gave compromise a chance. listen to republican bob corker, though, because there does seem to be a little bit of a crack on the republican side on whether or not it's okay to raise some taxes. >> i think there is a deal. the ying and yang is we know there has to be revenues, and i think -- look, i haven't met a wealthy republican or democrat in tennessee that's not willing to contribute more as long as they know we so
think they've already agreed to that. you heard john boehner say that already. we've had voteses in the senate where we've gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think that the vast majority of measures agree with that. the question is how do you do that and how do you allow taxes to rise at the same time you fix the real problem and that's uncontrolled entitlement spending and a government that has grown massively. >> i think if the house stands for anything, it's cut government spending as tom coburn said and i think we'll have to do more of it. we heard the mandate in 2010 where it was a clear mandate cut spending and we did, we cut $900 billion in spending that he can't like painful tos us. >> we'll continue our call to rise bol politics and make a deal. oufr guests this morning include mike jackson and also david zaslav. and the head of maris group. and douglas holtz-eakin. >> let's talk about eurozone finance ministers meeting to discuss whether to release a new tranche of fund to go greece. the leaders are not expected it to okay the funding despite greec
negotiate with speaker boehner, mitch mcconnell, or does he come in, give a set of demands and go hold a press conference? they can, i believe, hammer out -- >> same can the said on the other side, by the way. >> but if the president is willing to do it, the republicans have no choice. i mean, you can't turn down a president who just won re-election if he's sincere and willing to negotiate. >> going to take some bold initiatives which is my segue into your book, okay, because you've written this book about george washington and his bold moves to break the stalemate of the revolutionary war. so much has been written about george washington. what do you want readers to take away from this book that's new? >> well, i think particularly this morning is the launch of an american legacy book tour that calista and i are doing because she has two new children's books out for american history. the first thing is to say to people we have a long history of overcoming adversity. george washington is probably the greatest example of that, and in "victory at yorktown" you see him faced with a strate
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)